18 Keys to Healthy Weight Loss

Fad diets tend to have lots of very restrictive or complex rules, which give the impression that they carry scientific heft, when, in reality, the reason they often work (at least in the short term) is that they simply eliminate entire food groups, so you automatically cut out calories. Moreover, the rules are almost always hard to stick to and, when you stop, you regain the lost weight.

Rather than rely on such gimmicks, here we present 18 evidence-based keys for successful weight management. You don’t have to follow all of them, but the more of them you incorporate into your daily life, the more likely you will be successful at losing weight and—more important—keeping the weight off long term. Consider adding a new step or two every week or so, but keep in mind that not all these suggestions work for everyone. That is, you should pick and choose those that feel right for you to customize your own weight-control plan. Note also that this is not a “diet” per se and that there are no forbidden foods.

1. Start with a healthful diet.

That means a diet that’s rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes and low in refined grains, sugary foods, and saturated and trans fats. You can include fish, poultry, and other lean meats, and dairy foods (low-fat or nonfat sources are preferable to save calories). Aim for 20 to 35 grams of fiber a day from plant foods, since fiber helps fill you up and slows absorption of carbohydrates. A good visual aid to use is the USDA’s MyPlate, which recommends filling half your plate with vegetables and fruits. Grains (preferably whole grains) and protein foods should each take up about a quarter of the plate. For more details, see 14 Keys to a Healthy Diet.

2. Keep an eye on portions.

You can eat all the broccoli and spinach you want, but for higher-calorie foods, portion control is the key. Check serving sizes on food labels—some relatively small packages contain more than one serving, so you have to double or triple the calories, fat, and sugar if you plan to eat the whole thing. Popular “100-calorie” food packages do the portion controlling for you (though they won’t help much if you eat several packages at once).

3. Eat mindfully.

This involves increasing your awareness about when and how much to eat using internal (rather than visual or other external) cues to guide you. Eating mindfully means giving full attention to what you eat, savoring each bite, acknowledging what you like and don’t like, and not eating when distracted (such as while watching TV, working on the computer, or driving). Such an approach will help you eat less overall, while you enjoy your food more. Research suggests that the more mindful you are, the less likely you are to overeat in response to external cues, such as food ads, 24/7 food availability, and super-sized portions.

4. Eat slowly, chew well.

A component of mindful eating, this allows more time for satiety signals to reach the brain (it takes about 20 minutes), so slow eaters tend to feel more full and eat less. The process of chewing itself may also stimulate satiety signals. In addition, eating slowly makes you more aware of the smell, taste, and texture of the foods, which can lead to greater satisfaction with fewer calories. Keep in mind also that the most pleasure often comes from the first few bites of a food; after that, it’s the law of diminishing returns. Thus, you should focus on those first few tastes of chocolate, cake, or other indulgences, as this may be enough to satisfy. For gadget lovers, the HAPIfork ($99) is an electronic fork that vibrates if you don’t pause long enough between bites.

5. Don’t rely on willpower.

Instead, control your “food environment” so that you don’t unconsciously overfill your plate and eat when you’re not hungry. That means, for example, not having junk foods at home or at least keeping them out of sight (such as on a top shelf or in the back of the fridge)—and changing your routines so you don’t regularly encounter temptations (such as avoiding the office pantry between meals if it has enticing foods and driving a route that doesn’t take you past your favorite food places). Use smaller plates, bowls, cups, and utensils—you may even want to invest in portion-controlled plates (that delineate what reasonable serving sizes are) or portion-control devices (that allow you to measure your food directly on the plate); many different kinds are available online. Portion out snacks into small bowls or bags; don’t eat from large bags or boxes. You may not have control over everything in your food environment, but being aware of hidden food triggers and traps may be enough to keep you from overeating.

6. Identify emotional triggers that may be making you overeat.

For example, you may eat more when you are stressed, depressed, upset, angry, lonely, or even happy and excited. To distinguish between real hunger and emotional eating, rate your hunger/fullness levels before, during, and after eating on a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being “beyond hungry” or “starving” (with associated headaches, lightheadedness, and weakness) and 10 being “beyond full” (as in after-Thanksgiving-meal stuffed). Ideally you should eat when you are at level 3 (hungry but not yet uncomfortable) and stop at level 7 (full and satisfied). If you often eat for reasons other than hunger, find pleasurable non-food-related activities that you can do instead, such as going for a brisk walk or run.

 

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Featured Image Courtesy Of wakeneurology.com

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